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  • Breeding question.

    On page 51 of the breeding section of the Ultimate Care Guide Mr. Ronne is quoted as saying: "Typically this involves a one month period of darkness..." Is he referring to an 8 on 16 hours off light schedule or complete darkness? This question popped up on another forum and I'm curious as well. This kid has had his snakes in total darkness for a month and didn't witness copulation (lol lights help with seeing, dig it) so he's now trying to figure out what he's doing wrong and I'm curious as well.

    Mat.

  • #2
    Re: Breeding question.

    hard question without more info. There are so many ways that people prep their boas to breed, some are light cycled, some heat cycle, some food cycled, some just thrown together. 1st thing i would double and triple check is the sex of both snakes. I am currently planning my season for next year and will be doing a light and temp cycle for mine.
    s

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    • #3
      Re: Breeding question.

      Originally posted by dapozer View Post
      hard question without more info. There are so many ways that people prep their boas to breed, some are light cycled, some heat cycle, some food cycled, some just thrown together. 1st thing i would double and triple check is the sex of both snakes. I am currently planning my season for next year and will be doing a light and temp cycle for mine.
      s
      The question specifically is whether or not the quote meant total darkness or reduced lighting cycle. The language gets a little confusing because of the mention of no lighting in cage and only using flashlight to view etc... I'm pretty sure the "month of darkness' Jeff was referring to is just cycling but like I said, some people are finding the wording confusing.

      Mat.

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      • #4
        Re: Breeding question.

        I asked a few people and the majority said to cycle. Longer nights not total darkness. Sorry to highjack my question does heat really play a big roll?

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        • #5
          Re: Breeding question.

          Originally posted by Reyes81487 View Post
          I asked a few people and the majority said to cycle. Longer nights not total darkness. Sorry to highjack my question does heat really play a big roll?
          LOL thats the only part of the paragraph I'm not confused about. Jeff states that females who have been cooled and produce, do so in spite of the cooling not because of it. He also states he believes the cooling can be detrimental. The confusing part is that he gives two examples from Python cycling and then only debunks one, by not revisiting the 'darkness' idea he leaves the piece open to interpretation. So it can be confusing to the reader as to whether Jeff meant to say that both are bad or just the cooling. In this case the reader took the most literal interpretation of the comparison and decided that cooling was the defining difference between cycling boas and pythons, whereas 'darkness' was something they shared. Yes heat plays a very large role both during and after mating. You'll read many members stating things like "...she's not on the heat as much as I'd like" and things to that affect. Proper temps play a large role in all reptiles breeding practices, some can even be sexed by different temps. A sudden drop in temps could result in tragedy for your litter as the female needs to be on the heat for quite a while in order to produce healthy babies.

          Mat.

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          • #6
            Re: Breeding question.

            I've worked with animals my whole life cousins a vet. But I gotta say snakes are aliens to me so much work and effort and I love it. I had to wait till I was eighteen to buy my first snake because I had to move out and the parents wouldn't buy one for me. That was four years ago and till this day I'm still learning new crap.

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            • #7
              Re: Breeding question.

              I've worked with animals my whole life cousins a vet. But I gotta say snakes are aliens to me so much work and effort and I love it. I had to wait till I was eighteen to buy my first snake because I had to move out and the parents wouldn't buy one for me. That was four years ago and till this day I'm still learning new crap.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Breeding question.

                That statement in Jeff's article is confusing. I remember dwelling on it a bit some years back. My guess
                the intent was to mean a light cycle as darker in those winter months shorter daylight period

                It probably would be nice to have Jeff clarify further, just because

                Lar M
                Boas By Klevitz

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                • #9
                  Re: Breeding question.

                  alot of breeders i know say that they just let the light from the window or door or whatever determine when they start 'cycling'. when breeding season starts the days become shorter and the temps start to drop. its really not too hard to figure out, i personally just let the weather outside cycle the snakes. during the summer the sunlight hits the cages all day and well into the afternoon, and the temps are hot lol. cages never go under 82 on the cool side, during the day they are more like 85. then naturally in the late fall the outside temps drop, making the house alot cooler, thus the snake cage cool sides drop. all this happens without much effort on my part. all i really do is adjust the night drops between summer and winter.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Breeding question.

                    I am looking to breed how long personally do you recommend before getting into it. I am still learning and looking to learn more

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