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  • To cross, or not to cross?

    To cross, or not to cross?
    I have 1.0 CA Motley
    and 1.0 CA Hypo Motley
    I bought them for the motley gene, as I had read that the CA motley is fovored.
    However my collection is BCI.
    So do I cross and add the CA motley to the mix?
    Should I sell/trade them out and buy BCI males?
    *Replacement males may, or may not be motley, as I would then be free to shop for whatever I want (unless it is a trade)

  • #2
    Re: To cross, or not to cross?

    Central American Boas are also BCI's ... I'm a person who crosses . I have Sunsets, and I have Hypo Leopards that are crossed . I've had BCI/BCO crosses, and BCI/BCC crosses as well.
    It comes down to your personal preferences, or convictions. I appreciate those who keep things pure and true , but I think that their is room for both types of breeders in a hobby of animals that are kept in captivity .

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    • #3
      Re: To cross, or not to cross?

      Do not breed motley to motley. The super motley form is fatal.

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      • #4
        Re: To cross, or not to cross?

        I'd personally vote "no", I don't think we should be breeding things that do not breed in the natural world, especially since their habitat is disappearing at an alarming rate...meaning that the pure animals in captivity
        may soon be all that's left for many species. And while you're at it, please everyone try to avoid consuming "palm oil"!? Many pristine forests are burned so people can grow/supply more palm oil, and it's used in SO
        MANY things now...but it doesn't have to be!

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        • #5
          Re: To cross, or not to cross?

          I understand both sides, to cross or not to cross but I agree with [MENTION=9045]Morgans Boas[/MENTION] that there is room for both.
          http://berkeleyknebel.wix.com/mississippimorphs

          Photo credit:Eddie Ard .....Banner Credit:Big PaPa Ernest

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          • #6
            Re: To cross, or not to cross?

            Originally posted by Noelle7206 View Post
            I don't think we should be breeding things that do not breed in the natural world
            So, no sunglows? No moonglows? No hypos? No albinos? I might add that there are places in the world where crosses can happen naturally. Which helps lead to new subspecies and genetic diversity.

            [MENTION=4451]az-gunner[/MENTION] There are some spectacular crosses out there. There are people out there who think it's a cardinal sin to do so, but as long as you understand that they're out there and you are totally up front about the babies should you produce a viable litter and sell babies, then go for it.

            I second [MENTION=25796]acephantom903[/MENTION] though. Super mots are not viable.


            -Sean in NoCal
            “Americanism means the virtues of courage, honor, justice, truth, sincerity, and hardihood – the virtues that made America.”
            -Teddy Roosevelt.

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            • #7
              Re: To cross, or not to cross?

              Originally posted by Pandorasdad View Post
              So, no sunglows? No moonglows? No hypos? No albinos? I might add that there are places in the world where crosses can happen naturally. Which helps lead to new subspecies and genetic diversity....
              I will admit that many of these things are attractive & interesting, but I can manage to get along without them.

              That's why I specifically said ..."things that do not breed in the natural world". I know it happens, I understand diversity...but I also think people don't know when to quit. That's why we have "jungle corns" (a cross of
              a king snake & a corn snake, for those who don't know), and why we have ball pythons with head wobbles, etc. Nature is a FAR better judge than we are of what should survive, don't you think? What survives in the
              "real world" has been shaped by trial & error, but when we breed in captivity, rarely do we cull the unsuccessful, & never the way nature does. Remember that bright colors are rarely favored by natural selection, unlike
              what humans choose to breed for. And while it seems harmless (in captive pets), many times genes are linked to other "lethal" ones, or just to some traits that aren't as strong survival-wise.

              The question was asked & that's just my opinion. Obviously there are many here who will disagree, since many are breeding & hoping for cool variations. Money motivates as does finding & loving the unusual, no question.
              I agree with Pandorasdad that one should never misrepresent the offspring produced. (sadly, some do) I don't mean to be such a "wet blanket" on this, I just think "nature" does the best job.

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