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  • Shadow hunter

    just a few pics of my Boa, I don't know what kind he is so if someone do then pls tell me
    thanks





  • #2
    Re: Shadow hunter

    Looks like a normal BCI boa.

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    • #3
      Re: Shadow hunter

      He's pretty & looks very cozy. May I ask what sort of substrate he's on?

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      • #4
        Re: Shadow hunter

        ive been using organic potting soil and live plants for quite some time

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        • #5
          Re: Shadow hunter

          It looks pretty moist...no problems with skin infections? And many things are 'organic', but I don't believe it's safe for full-time exposure, or even part-time...? They sure don't have pet
          reptiles in mind. I sometimes add organic potting soil to my raised bed gardens...it's great for plants but there's good reasons that it's labeled "use gloves when handling & keep out of
          the reach of children". Your snake can pick up all sorts of pathogens from potting soil. I know some ppl use live plants but usually they are in containers, so the snake has plenty of dry
          surfaces also.

          Even with a good immune system, the problem is that when your snake defecates, the contamination stays & concentrates in that friendly (warm & moist) substrate, unless you completely
          replace it, which I'm guessing you don't because of the plants? In the great outdoors, snakes 'go' and move on, but in cages, they are constantly re-exposed until we clean & change litter.

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          • #6
            Re: Shadow hunter

            I just bought a T-Positive Nicaraguan Boa so I'm probably gonna use them as a breeding pair.
            itll be my first time so wish me luck
            ofc theyre not big enough yet so maybe in about a year.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Re: Shadow hunter

              nope shes been perfectly fine, I tried other stuff from the pet store everything dries out and I don't like it. and I don't much care for the wood chips. plus soil is in their natural habit. and its very easy to clean and dirt cheap lol

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              • #8
                Re: Shadow hunter

                I remove the area where I do see poo and replace it with new and also I change the whole tank bedding once per month at most it's been a month and a half

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                • #9
                  Re: Shadow hunter

                  Originally posted by 1nVersion View Post
                  ....plus soil is in their natural habit....
                  Yes, it is...but keep in mind that "potting soil" is man-made...maybe from "natural materials", but not as found in nature....I HOPE it is, but I'm not convinced that potting soil is safe to use this way. I am hoping that
                  others chime in on this question. Another thing: the term organic makes it sound SO safe, but plenty of things are 'organic' yet are still not something you'd want your snake sitting in (or yourself!) just saying?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Shadow hunter

                    Originally posted by Noelle7206 View Post
                    Yes, it is...but keep in mind that "potting soil" is man-made...maybe from "natural materials", but not as found in nature....I HOPE it is, but I'm not convinced that potting soil is safe to use this way. I am hoping that
                    others chime in on this question. Another thing: the term organic makes it sound SO safe, but plenty of things are 'organic' yet are still not something you'd want your snake sitting in (or yourself!) just saying?
                    I do agree, any suggestions? I'm open minded to try whatever so long as it doesn't harm the snake. I actually just got another snake about 5hours ago and plan on putting them together soon in a larger enclosure, and eventually breeding them.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Shadow hunter

                      Make sure you quarantine the new snake for a couple months, away from this one and you shouldn't plan on co-habbing them, snakes need separate enclosures. I'd also wonder why you are set on breeding already when you couldn't identify the snake you already owned?

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                      • #12
                        Re: Shadow hunter

                        Originally posted by GoingPostal View Post
                        Make sure you quarantine the new snake for a couple months, away from this one and you shouldn't plan on co-habbing them, snakes need separate enclosures. I'd also wonder why you are set on breeding already when you couldn't identify the snake you already owned?
                        Ditto! By all means enjoy one or more snakes as pets...(housed separately!) but realize how much work & expense it is to breed boas properly & care for all the offspring for as long as it takes to find them good homes.
                        The market for them isn't all that hot, especially for boas of mixed/unknown parentage...and FYI, you aren't going to sell them for what you see on price tags in pet stores...way way less, IF you're lucky. If you're not
                        "lucky" you'll be wondering what to do with all the offspring as they eat you out of house & home...don't forget they all need separate caging.

                        Quarantine: can't stress that enough, & as far as I know, IBD is "alive & well" among boids...a couple months is actually not long enough...to be safe, you need to wait 6-12 months. Also, it's NEVER a good idea to
                        breed snakes that you've just acquired (not even counting the risks of not quarantining them), as they are stressed when re-homed & more likely to have breeding problems, also may have other health issues which are
                        not immediately obvious. I wouldn't CONSIDER breeding a newly acquired snake for at least a year, no matter how healthy they look...it's not worth the risks.

                        Breeding boas (or any animals for that matter) should not be taken lightly if you truly care about them. Taking short-cuts will not get you the most responsible buyers who care either.

                        Keep in mind that if you house them together, many problems can result, not the LEAST of which is breeding much sooner than you anticipated, & sooner than what is healthy for them.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Shadow hunter

                          Originally posted by 1nVersion View Post
                          ... soil is in their natural habit. and its very easy to clean and dirt cheap lol
                          The thing is, soil may be IN their natural world, but they do NOT spend all their time ON it...sitting on substrate with constant moisture spells skin diseases, trust me, & no telling what else is IN "potting soil" as the content
                          can vary widely from brand to brand, or even batch to batch...they use whatever cheaply available ingredients can pass the 'description' of organic & get the job done for PLANTS. Some plants & tree products ARE toxic to
                          snakes...and you have no way of knowing what's in the mix you buy, much less any contamination that wouldn't hurt plants (the intended product use) but may make your snakes or other animals sick.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Shadow hunter

                            Also...when it comes to breeding snakes, boas or any other, it's important to know their approximate age. I'd not breed snakes that aren't physically mature, preferably 4 years or so...and not "too old" either.
                            Some people re-home snakes as "breeders" that are "past their prime" or of questionable health....getting a snake's history is important, as is only getting them from reputable sources.

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