Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Attitude and feeding

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Attitude and feeding

    I have a 4 ft red tail which I've had for 1 week now. I know that he stressed and adjusting to his new environment/owner. I have done extensive research before aquiring him, but I have encountered a problem that was not well covered in all that I read. The gentleman that I got him from had to give him up or his wife was going to make his life miserable. He had only had him for about 3 months. So I am the RTB's 3rd owner within a four month period. I'm sure his attitude is attributed to the continuous recent changes he's been forced to go through. Getting to the point: I gave him a week to adjust to his new surroundings and habitat (which is the same habitat from his previous owner, just new water bowl and hideaway) before I tried to feed him. His diet has consisted of "live" small rats. The previous owner said that he tried to convert him from live to frozen, but no matter what he tried, the RTB would not eat the frozen. My dilemma is this: When I first got him I was able to handle him with no problem, he showed the signs of a normal, healthy snake! Now one week after owning him, I cannot even come close to picking him up without him striking at me. I was forced to throw a hankerchief over his head in order to grab him behind his head to prevent him from biting me. I then placed him in his feeding container and gave him a small rat (live). He striked the rat 3 times over a 20 minute period, none of which inflicted any damage to the rat. I even covered the container allowing only the smallest amount of light in. I continuously checked and watched the snake/rat to make sure the rat didn't try to bite or attack the snake. After 45 minutes I decided to put the snake back in his habitat. Again he wanted to strike at me. Once back in his habitat he assumed the strike position for about 20 minutes before finally going to his corner where he usually resides. I don't want to stress him out too much, but I want to keep him on his normal feeding schedule. What do you recommend I do to try and make him more "user friendly?" ??? :-/

  • #2
    Re: Attitude and feeding

    Well simply put, it is going to take more time....

    An acclimation period can vary from boa to boa, but obviously yours has not settled in just yet...  I would allow some more time for your  boa to acclimate....

    A good sign of acclimation is activity or "prowling".  If you get to the point that the boa is prowling or exploring, it is a good bet that he is settling in..

    Also a solid feeding schedule is important, but not as much as the acclimation period... A 4 foot boa can miss a meal or two, and then get back on a schedule without a problem...

    The big picture problem is stress, and I would not count on the boa eating or stopping the agressive behavior until the acclimation period is completed.
    To gain knowledge is good, but to share knowledge is wise

    -Best Regards
    -Clay English
    Founder Redtailboas.com 1998-2013

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Attitude and feeding

      Being that it is going to take more time to acclimate, he is going to miss at least one feeding schedule. Should I try to feed him frozen since he will definitely be more hungy than usual? I want to make the switch to frozen for his overall health and safety. Finally, once I notice him "on the prowl" after he has acclimated, should I attempt to handle him like normal, or do you think he will still be snotty from being hungry, new environment, etc...? Thanks in advance for all your help!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Attitude and feeding

        I would like to see you try the frozen/thawed switch, but I also know that it is much much more important for the acclimation process to succeed.

        If the acclimation is a success and handling seems to be going well, then offer the frozen/thawed food item... You can always offer fresh killed/stunned if the thawed is refused..

        My care guide on Feeding pre-killed vs. live covers many ways to help convert to feeding thawed rodents..

        Just remember that first the acclimation period is much more important...
        To gain knowledge is good, but to share knowledge is wise

        -Best Regards
        -Clay English
        Founder Redtailboas.com 1998-2013

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Attitude and feeding

          I agree with Clay. The acclimation period can vary from snake to snake. However, it may also require daily handling. Give him another week or two and if all else fails, you may want to handle him about 15 minutes a day and more upwards until he settles down. Might be a good idea to buy you a thick pair of leather gloves as well.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Attitude and feeding

            HI,
            I feel your stress, I have had boa's that were pet store returns one was an argie that had all the bad traits your expressing.
            You need to find a way to handle the boa's without you being attacked. I used a small bathtowel over the head and would make that boa sit on my lap and chil. a sort of Iam ok your ok.
             this would be done after the acclimation period.
             I have seen large pythons that had to be fed with snake hooks
            or clamps I would never grab a snake with one, they have broken bones with clamps, but your could hold a dead rat and allow the snake to hit it repeatably without any risk to you, the mouthing of the food will sometimes trigger a feeding response..


             Time will help this boa to learn to trust you its  proably spent the last year in a cage without human contact except for feeding ,, they can revert back to a stage thats close to wild caught.. I use large coleman ice chest for feeding boxes
            drill about 10-15 1/4 in holes in the lid and lock it on, toss the fresh thawed rat in the box next to the snake lock the lid and leave the room for an hour. if when i come back (this is where you need a snake hook or clamp, I will retireve that rat and tap it on the side of the box and pull it away if the snake tries to get it and finally allow him to hit it and carefully close the lid and leave the room again. I usally do this acouple times and then the food is gone.  If the boa is stil in that feeding mode post feeding IE he's gonna nail you good, i dump him gently out of the ice chest back in his cage (( gently)) : the feed box sort of increases the feeding response with time, I had a young guyana that if I put him in the cooler he thought it was feeding time, and expected one too.. hehe
            I haven't had a snake that didn't convert to thawed this way. he thinks its live
            here's apic of a yearling guyana waiting for lunch and he's got that feeding look

            here's rudee looking for that rat(the rats in the sink in the bathroom stil thawing, but he thinks there's got to be one in the box.

            the guy I bought him from swore he would only eat live mice thats why he 's so thin,, two feeding and he was on fresh thawed rats...
              doug  

            Comment

            Working...
            X