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  • Resistant Respiratory Infection in Boas

    This is a post from Jeff Ronne on the treatment of resistant Respiratory Infection in Boas.

    This covers the use of Tylan, which is what I use as well.

    Now Jeff's article.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Here is something I had written on it a couple years ago. Let me know if it helps!

    Good luck!

    Jeff


    This may not be very exciting but this may be the most important E-mail I send via this little newsletter thing. Anyhow here goes!

    I am not a Dr. I am barely even literate as my writings will attest. I am not a Vet or even a Vet Tech. I didn't even take Chemistry in high school (schedule conflict). Loved science and was good at it but absolutely no training or expertise in the field, but I am sharing my experience here and now. I am not recommending you follow this but am merely relaying what I have observed. There are laws I think against giving medical advise without a license. Maybe even regarding Boa medicine. I am unlicensed and only retelling what has occurred here.

    As many of you know, I breed Boas. That's is, just Boas. I bred Ball Pythons once but that was really an accident. I am breeding a lot of Boas. I mean, a LOT of Boas. Every year I end up with a few Boas, which at the end of breeding season, have respiratory problems or in general get run down as a result of going through the stress of the long breeding season which, in Boas lasts from 2-5 or even up to 6 months. I have usually just watched these stressed Boas for a while keeping them slightly warmer than usual (85 degrees F or so) until the animal resumed vigorous feeding and returns to normal. Most snap out of it and take off again. However, a handful may require more TLC. I have used a number of anti- biotics with very limited success but what choice do we have but to try to do our best to take proper care of the animals we are entrusted for. I have used Amakacin, Baytril, Trimethoprim sulfa and Fortaz all with limited success. Very limited indeed. Health problems occasionally occur out of the blue at any time of the year in addition to the post breeding season. If the problem is so advanced as to be an obvious respiratory problem, it is probably quite severe and experience has taught me I have a really slim chance of curing the problem. I have had these animals to a good reptile vet for bacterial cultures and the recommended drug has been Amakacin or Baytril. These, in my experience in Boa Constrictors, have been very ineffective in bringing the animals around. Whether or not they knocked down the bacterial problem is to me irrelevant if the animal has lost the will to live. Bottom line I want the animal to spring back and do well. They seem to get so run down and just give up.

    I have heard for years of the existence of a drug called Tylan or Tylosin which has been used in Burmese for chronic respiratory problems. I have heard the Burms, in some cases have been treated for months on end with this dope with good results in warding off these respiratory problems. I figured I would give it a try. I spoke with a large Python guy who said he gave 50 mg/kg of this drug every three days long term with excellent results. I decided to give it a whirl. Tylan is used in swine and cattle for a number of problems and I purchased this over the counter at a local feed store in a bottle, big enough to treat a herd of cattle along with a few sick Boas. I injected the Tylan sub q which means just under the skin. This was repeated three more times waiting three days between each injection. Normal precautions were taken with alcohol and cotton balls. The results were UNBOALIEVABLE!

    Part II is the next post: *
    Last edited by ClayEnglish; 02-14-2011, 01:22 PM.
    To gain knowledge is good, but to share knowledge is wise

    -Best Regards
    -Clay English
    Founder Redtailboas.com 1998-2013

  • #2
    Re: Resistant RI in Boas

    Jeff's article continued.....

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`
    Here is the remaining information:

    One of the Boas I treated had had a chronic respiratory problem for about three years. This Boa was given to me by a friend of mine who was going to put her to sleep because he could not clear this up and he did not want his other animals to get this problem. She was dripping mucus from her mouth in such large quantities that she fogged up her cage glass in a matter of days after cleaning. She went into a shed and after shedding until now some 8 months later there has been absolutely no cold, no snot, nothing. She has been doing fantastic as have all the other animals I treated at that time. I had a particularly bad year last year and 11 animals with various and sundry problems which I treated with Tylan with fantastic results. Normally most of these animals would have died. They are wonderful!

    Sent a preliminary copy to Dave & Tracy Barker. Dave was nice enough to sent the following response along with some additional helpful
    information:

    "Hi Jeff, congrats on Volume 1, Issue 1 of the B.I.N. It is informative and interesting. Tylan was considered a wonder drug back in the mid 1970s. It cured many things that chloromycetin (our other wonder-drug back then) wouldn't touch, plus we could buy it without a prescription. It is very safe (I'm sure this isn't true, but I don't think one can over-dose it, at least I've seen it used very carelessly with no visible bad effects.) It's usually administered daily for two weeks, but I say go with what works. The thing about it is that it has little or no effect on gram-negative bacteria, which is the general type of bacteria that most-often causes disease in reptiles. But Tylan is one of few drugs that effectively treats a little-known and poorly understood group of organisms called micoplasms. Micoplasms are known to occasionally cause disease. They are difficult to culture and you have to specifically request that a culture be run for micoplasms, as they grow more slowly than bacteria. Most antibiotics have no effect on micoplasms. Most of the time Tylan is ineffective to use as a hit-or-miss antibiotic. But when it works, it can be dramatic. It would be my guess that the problems you've been seeing in your boa colony are caused by micoplasms. Just be aware that when Tylan doesn't work, it may be time to pull out the amikacin. "

    Dave Barker
    Perhaps Boas in particular or at least Boas here at my place have been particularly vulnerable to these microplasms. Perhaps gram negative bacteria is not so common in Boa constrictors. Who knows? I just know I am very happy to have heard about and tried Tylan which has been the "wonder drug" for my Boas coming out of the breeding season along with the stresses the breeding season brings.


    Jeff Ronne
    Last edited by ClayEnglish; 03-09-2008, 07:03 PM.
    To gain knowledge is good, but to share knowledge is wise

    -Best Regards
    -Clay English
    Founder Redtailboas.com 1998-2013

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Resistant RI in Boas

      Also wanted to mention that there are currently 2 strengths of Tylan, and that is Tylan 50 and Tylan 200.

      Of course you should buy Tylan 200 if it is available in your market area. *It will reduce the dosage size by 75% over using the Tylan 50 product. 1/4 the dosage means less discomfort during the injection. By the way Tylan is available at most feed stores, and farm and supply stores, and does not require a prescription.

      So using the Tylan 200 would work out this way

      200 mg = 1 ml = 1 cc *

      Some more math examples
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      1ml/200mg * 200mg = 1ml again the mg cancel out. Say we wanted to administer 75mg. *

      1ml/200mg ** 75mg = (75mg*ml)/200mg = 0.375ml *

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      It should be administered in the cranial third (or the front third of the body) in the muscle on either side of the spine. You can also inject most subcutaneously, or just under the skin. *
      Last edited by ClayEnglish; 05-02-2005, 10:44 AM.
      To gain knowledge is good, but to share knowledge is wise

      -Best Regards
      -Clay English
      Founder Redtailboas.com 1998-2013

      Comment

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