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  • My New Member Introduction

    Hello to everyone!...My name is Swan...new to the site here...so far it looks interesting...am looking to obtain a boa for my own...it has been a long time since I had a snake, and this time I want to get a hatching and do it right. Who knows...maybe even start getting more, and breeding....but I want to learn how to do it right, so any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated...

  • #2
    Re: My New Member Introduction

    Welcome to RTB. I believe there is information for breeding on the home page..

    Sent from my SM-G386T using Tapatalk
    sigpicJrock23

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    • #3
      Re: My New Member Introduction

      Welcome! We'd be glad to help you with more specific questions after you've had some time to read up on things. And as far as I'm concerned, the only 'dumb question' is the one NOT asked.

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      • #4
        Re: My New Member Introduction

        Boas aren't really ever hatchlings as they are live born.

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        • #5
          Re: My New Member Introduction

          Originally posted by acephantom903 View Post
          Boas aren't really ever hatchlings as they are live born.
          FYI- The proper term for such a live-born snake is "neonate". And perhaps the OP is looking for one of the more unusual boas that DO lay eggs (& hence produce "hatchlings")? LOL!

          Here is an excerpt for the edification of all:

          Boas of the World

          Overview

          Boas (Boidae) are a family of nonvenomous snakes found in America, Africa, Europe, Asia and some Pacific Islands. 43 species of Boas, are currently recognized, in two subfamilies, (eight genera). Boas (and python) families share a number of characteristics.including a vestigial pelvic girdle with hind limbs that are partially visible as a pair of spurs, one on either side of the vent. In males, these anal spurs may be larger than in females. Boas, however differ from the pythons by bone and dental differences in their skull. All species of pythons lay eggs and although most species of boas have live young, the following 3 species lay eggs:-
          Charina reinhardtii - Calabar Boa (Note that although this species is often called a” Calabar Python”, it is actually a boa!).
          Gongylophis muelleri -Saharan Sand Boa.
          Eryx jayakari - Arabian Sand Boa NOTE THAT HATCHLINGS DO NOT HAVE AN EGG TOOTH.

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          • #6
            Re: My New Member Introduction

            Welcome to RTB and as you can see, there are people with a wealth of information here, just ask and we will help you all we can. Look up the Ultimate Care Guide on the home page, it should answer a lot of the questions you may have.
            http://berkeleyknebel.wix.com/mississippimorphs

            Photo credit:Eddie Ard .....Banner Credit:Big PaPa Ernest

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